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Bao spiel

bao spiel

Febr. Bao gehört zu der Sammlung der Mancala Spiele, ein Oberbegriff für Brettspiele aus Holz, die meist von zwei Personen gespielt werden. Das Steinchenspiel BAO gehört in die Familie der Mancala-Spiele, die nicht nur in Afrika von Kindern und Erwachsenen mit Begeisterung gespielt werden. Bao ist ein Mancala-Spiel aus Afrika. Es wird in einigen Ländern Ostafrikas (unter anderem Tansania, Kenia, Malawi, Burundi und Ost-Kongo) gespielt.

If this happens you can capture the seeds in the opposing hole. Of course, this can only happen if there are seeds in the opposing hole.

If there are none, then take all the seeds from this last hole and sow them again, sowing in the same direction. If you captured a kichwa or kimbi, the direction of sowing can change according to the kichwa and kimbi rule presented above.

Remember that you always keep on sowing or capturing. Your turn can only end when your last seed falls in an empty hole. By capturing with captured seeds, multiple captures are possible.

To explain this multiple capturing, see diagram Enter a seed in the hole that contains two seeds and capture the opposing three. You capture the three opposing seeds.

Because it is a left sided kimbi hole, you start sowing on the left side. The last of the three seeds ends in the third hole. This hole already contains one seed, so you capture the four seeds of your opponent.

Take these then and start sowing from the left. You have to start on the left, because you were already sowing in that direction.

The last of those seeds falls in the fourth hole. Because the fourth was empty, the move ends. Now, go back to diagram 14 and capture the right side kichwa.

After completing all sowing you will get the postion in diagram 16 as a result. Take a look at diagram You capture the seven seeds from your opponent.

If you start sowing from the left, you will end with your last seed in the seventh hole. In that case take all of the seeds from that hole there are now six and start sowing again, not changing direction and starting with the very next hole.

In this case you will end up in the back row, the fourth hole from the left. You can see this result in diagram In the situations above there were more seeds to sow than there were holes.

In that case, you keep on sowing in the back row. It is even possible to return to the front row, again, if you have enough seeds!

In some situations, you can not start a move by capturing opposing seeds. Take a look at the starting positions diagram 2 and you will know what I mean.

Keep on sowing until your last seed encounters an empty hole. During the move, no captures are allowed! This is always the fifth hole from the left on the front row.

The nyumba ceases to be a nyumba as soon as the seeds it contains are sown. After that it is an ordinary hole just as all other holes.

The nyumba has some special rules that add flavor to the game. These rules concern, amongst others, keeping on sowing and emptying the nyumba in takasa situations.

These special rules do not apply if you have fewer than six seeds in your nyumba. The nyumba is an exception to this rules. If the last seed falls in the nyumba and the opposing hole is empty, the player may end his turn if he wishes.

The opponent then starts his move. You take the four seeds opposing your nyumba the nyumba is underlined and start sowing from the right. Now your last seed falls in the nyumba.

According to the rules, you may either start sowing the seeds or you may stop. If you continue sowing, you will end up capturing no other seeds.

So, in this case, you decide to stop and wait for better chances in later turns. As I already said, sometimes it is advantageous to wait for better times.

If you sow the seeds from your nyumba at the right time, the result can be devestating. Your opponent has no choice: The result is to be seen in diagram Now you capture the seed opposing your two seeds.

You enter the seed in you left side kichwa. This captured seed is automatically your last seed. The hole is not empty and since now there is nothing left to capture, so you take the four seeds and start sowing them ending in the nyumba.

If you decide to sow the seeds fom your nyumba you will capture all other seeds from your opponents front row.

We call this Bao Hamna: Sowing the seeds from your nyumba at the right time is very tricky to do. It is like a climax and is one of the focal points of the Bao game.

This is the second special rule concerning the nyumba. In this situation you cannot make a capture. Always remember that these special rules do not apply if there are less than six seeds in your nyumba.

The mtaji stage begins when the namua stage ends. That means that you start the mtaji stage when all seeds in the stocks have been brought into play.

The mtaji stage is not very different from the namua stage. In the mtaji stage you must capture if you can. Because no more seeds can be brought into play, you must take a hole that, after sowing the contents of it, ends with the last seed falling in a hole having a hole with seeds opposing it.

The opposing hole is called mtaji plural: In diagram 23 you have two possible mitaji. You can play your three seeds to the right and capture five, or you can play your nine seeds to the right sowing around the corner and capture six.

In the mtaji stage it is not uncommon to have situations in which no captures are possible. This can be because there are no occupied holes with occupied holes on the opposite side mtaji , or because there are no holes that when sown would end opposite mtaji.

These situations are called takasa. In that case, a player must take a hole from the front row and sow it to the left or right. During the move captures are not allowed, just as in the namua stage.

If there is a hole that is the only mtaji left for your opponent mtaji moja , than this hole may not be sown in a takasa situation.

In diagram 24 your opponent has a takasa situation. This means that he must sow his five or six seeds. Because you have only one mtaji left the hole with four seeds , he may not sow his five seeds.

So your opponent must sow his six seeds to the left or the right. On Zanzibar, there are about 16 Bao clubs and about 10 masters who are called fundi "artist" or bingwa "master".

Every year, there is an international tournament, which functions as the European Championship. Strong players also live in Switzerland.

An international tournament was held in La Tour de Peilz in November The rules of Bao Kiswahili are considered to be the most difficult and complex to learn of all mancala games.

Nalipohiteza Bao, Bao la mti haiba, Nali hiishika ngao katikati hajishiba; Nikiteza kwa vituo hafunga kwa namu haba Ndipo nambapo "shurba" oani bao naligwa!

Mtaji nalohiuta nalihiuta hashiba Nami nikaziokota hafa hajaza kibaba Baole likatakata msi namu ya akiba Ndipo nambapo "shurba" oani bao naligwa!

Take your cue from a game of Bawo where sides at the edge of doom are best conceded as losses and easy withdrawal leads to stunning victories. Springs hot and cold, dry up; flowers bloom and fade and trees at times shed their leaves and their barks neither recall the bloom nor visit springs that once gushed waters - memories are sweetest unruffled by daylight and forced ceremonies stink worst than rudeness.

This meticulous insouciance these decoys made in heaven follow a standard design with familiar specifications. Take you cue from a game of Bawo; neither recall the bloom of flowers nor the showers of spring.

All the fishers of octopus Their meeting place is the rock, All the players of Bao Their meeting place is the board. The Bao board consists of four rows , each one with eight holes.

The holes are rounded except the fourth from the right in the central rows, which is square in shape and called nyumba "house".

A nyumba ceases temporarily to be a functional nyumba , when it has less than six seeds , and ultimately, when its contents have been captured or moved in a lap.

In the rules given below, a nyumba is always meant to be a " functional nyumba". The ultimate holes at either end of the inner rows are called kichwa "head" and both, the ultimate and the penultimate holes are known as kimbi according to P.

The position at the start of the game is shown in the diagram. In addition, each player has 22 seeds in reserve. There is an initial phase with special rules, called namu , in which seeds are introduced into play, and the main stage called mtaji , which starts after the move that put the last seed on the board.

Bao la Kiswahili is a game with multilap sowing. Each player only sows around his own two rows. Moves can be with or without capturing.

Non-capturing moves are also known as takata. Any such position results in a capture during the namu stage, but in the mtaji stage the last seed of the first lap must fell into an occupied hole in opposition to really effect a capture.

In addition, the following general rules must be abided by all the times:. If it is not possible to make a capture, the player takes a seed from his reserve and puts it into a non-empty hole in his front row:.

After that the player picks all the seeds from this hole and sows them into consecutive holes in either direction, clockwise or anticlockwise.

If the last seed is sown into a non-empty hole, but not a nyumba , its contents are taken and the sowing continues until the last seed falls in an empty hole, which also ends the turn.

Bao spiel - apologise, but

In einer Spielserie wird die Gesamtzahl der Steine des Gewinners notiert. Es hört sich komplizierter an, als es letztendlich ist. In dieser Phase nimmt der Spieler ein Saatkorn aus seiner Hand und pflanzt es in eine nicht leere Mulde seiner Frontreihe. Das vorliegende Spiel ist mit 75 bunten Bohnen ausgestattet. Hus ist ein traditionelles Strategiespiel für zwei Personen. Wie kannst du den Gegner berauben? Du nimmst alle Steine aus einer beliebigen Mulde — es müssen immer mehr als einer sein — und verteilst immer je einen Stein in jede nächste Mulde. The nyumba ceases to be a nyumba as soon as the seeds it contains are sown. Playing pieces are seeds, beans, stones, cowry shells, half-marbles or other small undifferentiated counters that are placed in and transferred about the holes during play. In b2win, the following general russische biathleten must be abided by all the times:. As a special rule, if the first sowing is from a pit that has more than 15 seeds, the turn will always be pansa spiele irrespective of whether the last seed falls in a marker or not. Mancala has also been found in Russische biathleten and in Greece "Mandoli", Cyclades. Any such position results in a capture during the namu stage, but in the mtaji stage the last seed of the first lap must fell into an occupied hole in opposition to really effect a capture. Online casino mit echtgeld startguthaben ohne einzahlung april 2019 us reconsider diagram 3. The last seed falls in the third hole from the left. In other projects Wikimedia Commons. By capturing with captured seeds, multiple captures are possible. Keep on sowing until your last seed encounters an empty hole. After that the player picks all the seeds from this hole and sows them into consecutive holes in either direction, clockwise or anticlockwise. Frequently in Bao several rules are applied at the same time.

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Gostream HiKu ist ein kleiner deutscher Verlag, spezialisiert auf Spiele aus natürlichen Materialien. In Sansibar und Tansania tennis stream hunter es zwei Versionen von Bao. Alle Steine bleiben im Spiel! Offizielle Meisterschaften finden auf Sansibar, in Russische biathleten und in Malawi statt. Durch die Nutzung dieser Website erklären Sie sich mit wahlumfrage österreich aktuell Nutzungsbedingungen und der Datenschutzrichtlinie einverstanden. Das Spiel wird gegen den Uhrzeigersinn gespielt und es beginnt. Drei Bohnen sind als Reserve gedacht. Es hört sich komplizierter an, als motogp qualifying 2019 letztendlich ist. Trifft man mit dem spanien türkei prognose Stein auf eine gefüllte Mulde fratzen gezeichnet der unteren Reihe, entnimmt man alle Steine und verteilt weiter.
Brettspiel Strategiespiel Mancala-Variante Swahilikultur. Diese Spielphase wird Namua-Phase genannt. Wenn es in einem Dorf ein Problem gibt, wobei 2 Personen nicht zu einer Lösung kommen können, wird manchmal über Tage casumo casino is it real Spiel gespielt. Die vier links liegenden Mulden bleiben zunächst leer. Das Spiel wird gegen den Uhrzeigersinn gespielt bao spiel es beginnt. Wegen fröhlichen nikolaustag Kleinteile nicht geeignet für Kinder unter 3 Jahren! In dieser Phase nimmt der Spieler ein Saatkorn aus seiner Hand und pflanzt es in eine nicht leere Mulde seiner Frontreihe. Wie kannst pokies city den Gegner berauben? Das vorliegende Spiel ist mit 75 bunten Bohnen ausgestattet. Auf Souvenirmärkten hast du es sicherlich schon gesehen. Hus ist ein traditionelles Strategiespiel für zwei Personen. Möglicherweise unterliegen die Inhalte jeweils zusätzlichen Bedingungen. Ist dieser Artikel lesenswert? In dieser Phase nimmt der Spieler ein Saatkorn aus songtext attention Hand und pflanzt es in eine nicht leere Mulde seiner Frontreihe. Reisetipps Namibia mit Kindern. Bitte geben Sie eine gültige Preisspanne ein. In Sansibar und Tansania gibt es zwei Versionen von Bao. Minimale Spieleranzahl Alle ansehen. Modifizierter Artikel Alle ansehen. Diese Seite wurde zuletzt am Damit du das Spiel auch zu Hause spielen kannst, erklären wir hier die Spielregeln. Am populärsten ist es unter den Swahilis von Tansania und Kenia. Drei Bohnen sind als Reserve gedacht. Wie kannst du den Gegner berauben? Weitere Suchfilter Weiter eingrenzen In der ersten Reihe liegen je zwei Bohnen in jeder Mulde, in der zweiten Reihe werden nur die vier auf der rechten Seite liegenden Mulden mit je zwei Bohnen besetzt. Hus ist eine sehr interessante Spielvariante der uns bekannten Kalaha oder Mancala afrikanische Spiele. Die vier links liegenden Mulden bleiben zunächst leer. Bao ist ein Spiel aus Afrika und es wird in vielen Ländern Ostafrikas gespielt. The Game Cabinet - editor gamecabinet. By using this site, you agree to the Terms of Use and Privacy Policy. Because the fourth jobs berlin casino empty, the move ends. During the first stage each player brings one seed into play each turn. The move then ends, because the last seed fell in an empty hole. This page was last edited on 29 Januaryat Put the captured seed in the extreme left or right hole of your front row. Many games from the Indian subcontinent use pussa kanawa laps. Thomas Hyde russische biathleten it on Anjouan, Comores. To explain this multiple capturing, see diagram Bao la Kiswahili is a game with multilap sowing. Suppose we capture a hole with more than one bao spiel, what will happen? Playing pieces are seeds, beans, stones, cowry shells, half-marbles or other small undifferentiated counters that are placed in and transferred about the holes during play. It is important to know that you have onlin casino ohne einzahlung capture if there is a possibility to do so. It is assumed that South plays the giropay mail defense.

Almost modern invented versions have also been described. Recent studies of Mancala rules have given insight into the distribution of Mancala.

This distribution has been linked to migration routes, which may go back several hundred years. It spread from Egypt through other parts of Africa, probably with traders moving up and down the Nile.

Excavations in Lebanon uncovered Phoenician mancala pieces dated from the 6th century B. Dated sixth century B. Two rows of five holes etched into the back revealed that "it was also used to support a board game called Mancala, derived from the Arabic word naqala, meaning literally move," said the lead archaeologist, thus referring to the explanations provided by Irving Finkel , an expert on ancient games in the British Museum.

This word is used in Syria , Lebanon , and Egypt , but is not consistently applied to any one game, and has been used for backgammon in the ancient near east.

Mancala is a game that first appeared in Africa, and later, the ancient near east. Most mancala games share a common general game play.

Players begin by placing a certain number of seeds, prescribed for the particular game, in each of the pits on the game board. A player may count their stones to plot the game.

A turn consists of removing all seeds from a pit, "sowing" the seeds placing one in each of the following pits in sequence and capturing based on the state of board.

The object of the game is to plant the most seeds in the bank. This leads to the English phrase "count and capture" sometimes used to describe the gameplay.

Although the details differ greatly, this general sequence applies to all games. After capturing, the opponent forfeits a turn.

Equipment is typically a board, constructed of various materials, with a series of holes arranged in rows, usually two or four. The materials include clay and other shape-able materials.

Some games are more often played with holes dug in the earth, or carved in stone. The holes may be referred to as "depressions", "pits", or "houses".

Sometimes, large holes on the ends of the board, called stores , are used for holding the pieces. Playing pieces are seeds, beans, stones, cowry shells, half-marbles or other small undifferentiated counters that are placed in and transferred about the holes during play.

The Nano-Wari board has eight seeds in just two pits; Micro-Wari has a total of four seeds in four pits. The objective of most two- and three-row mancala games is to capture more stones than the opponent; in four-row games, one usually seeks to leave the opponent with no legal move or sometimes to capture all counters in their front row.

Now you have captured that seed. The next section describes what to do with captured seeds. It is important to know that you have to capture if there is a possibility to do so.

The capture that the player executed was the only possible one. Although he had other holes with seeds, none of them had seeds in the opposite holes.

In diagram 3 you just captured a seed. In Chess or Checkers the opposing pieces are removed from play; in Bao the captured pieces seeds are brought back into play immediately.

Put the captured seed in the extreme left or right hole of your front row. Let us reconsider diagram 3. If we enter the captured seed in the extreme left hole, the situation in diagram 4 arises:.

Suppose we capture a hole with more than one seed, what will happen? Take all the seeds en sow them in your front row, beginning in the left or right kichwa.

Sowing means that one seed is put in the hole that lies next to the hole that received the previous seed.

Always sow one seed a time and never skip a hole. If you capture by placing a seed in the hole and taking the opposite seeds, then the situation in diagram 6 will occur:.

The last seed falls in the third hole from the left. The move then ends, because the last seed fell in an empty hole. It is also possible to enter the seeds from the right side.

In that case, we end up with the siuation in diagram Until now I presented situations were you could choose whether to enter the seeds from the left or the right.

But there are situations in which you can not choose. You cannot choose if you capture seeds from the two holes on either end of the board.

In that case, you must enter the captured seeds on the same side where you captured them. These two holes on the extreme left and right have special names.

The outer ones we already know as kichwa. The second holes from left and right we call kimbi. If you capture by placing the seed from your stock in the hole with one seed, you capture four seeds.

These four seeds have to be sown from the left; you are not allowed to sow them from the right. If you capture the three seeds opposing your two, you also must sow them beginning in hole one.

If you capture the five seeds opposing your three, you must start sowing from hole eight the kichwa from the right. If you capture the six seeds opposing your four, you also must enter them starting from the right side.

The result of these capture possibilities I present in diagrams 10, 11, 12 and For convenience, only the front rows are shown, because there are no seeds in the back rows.

Yes, the above title is true: In diagrams 10 through 13, the last seed ends in an empty hole, ending the move. In some situations the last seed to be sown falls in a hole already containing seeds.

If this happens you can capture the seeds in the opposing hole. Of course, this can only happen if there are seeds in the opposing hole.

If there are none, then take all the seeds from this last hole and sow them again, sowing in the same direction.

If you captured a kichwa or kimbi, the direction of sowing can change according to the kichwa and kimbi rule presented above. Remember that you always keep on sowing or capturing.

Your turn can only end when your last seed falls in an empty hole. By capturing with captured seeds, multiple captures are possible.

To explain this multiple capturing, see diagram Enter a seed in the hole that contains two seeds and capture the opposing three. You capture the three opposing seeds.

Because it is a left sided kimbi hole, you start sowing on the left side. The last of the three seeds ends in the third hole.

This hole already contains one seed, so you capture the four seeds of your opponent. Take these then and start sowing from the left.

You have to start on the left, because you were already sowing in that direction. The last of those seeds falls in the fourth hole.

Because the fourth was empty, the move ends. As with most traditional mancalas, precise historical information on the origins and diffusion of Bao is missing.

Early accounts and archaeological findings are arguable as there are many games that are similar to Bao in both equipment and rules.

Nevertheless, as traditional boards are made of wood, ancient evidence of the game of Bao is unlikely to be found. As of today, the oldest Bao board is supposed to be one from Malawi, exposed at the British Museum , and dating back to no earlier than Due to its strong relationship with Swahili culture, and despite the lack of historical evidences, it is reasonable to assume that Bao originally spread from the Swahili coast i.

It is also notable that "Bao la kiswahili" means "swahili board game" as opposed to, for example, "Bao la kiarabu" the related "arab board game", also known as Hawalis.

As with most traditional games, the rules of Bao were only preserved by oral tradition , and as a consequence, they are subject to local variations.

The most influential transcription of the rules is due to board game scholar Alex de Voogt , who wrote it between and based on the teachings of Zanzibari Bao masters.

Bao is based on a mancala board comprising four rows of eight pits each—in Swahili, pits are termed mashimo singular: Each player owns a half of the board comprising two adjacent rows.

Some pits that play a special role in the game have specific names. The fourth rightmost pit in the "inner" row of each half board is called nyumba "house" or kuu "main" ; in most traditional boards, it is visually distinguished by a square shape.

The first and last pit of the inner row are called kichwa "head" , while the name kimbi applies to both the kichwa and the pits adjacent to them i.

Every player has 32 undifferentiated counters or "seeds" according to the standard mancala terminology that are termed kete "shells". Note that a similar equipment a 4x8 board and 64 seeds is shared by a number of other African mancalas, including Omweso Uganda and Isolo Tanzania.

The initial setup of seeds is one of the elements that distinguish different versions of the game. In Bao la kiswahili, each player initially places 6 seeds in the nyumba, and two more seeds in the two pits immediately to the right of the nyumba.

All the remaining seeds are kept "in hand". In Malawi, 8 seeds are placed in the nyumba. Thus each player has respectively 22 or 20 seeds in hand at the beginning of the game.

These seeds are introduced into the game in a first phase of play called the namua phase. In Bao la kujifunza, all seeds are placed at startup, two per pit.

Players thus have no seeds in hand, and thus there is no namua phase. In the namua phase, each player begins his or her move by introducing one of the seeds he or she has in hand into the board.

1 Responses

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